Trees for free

This year I was going to try and back fill the tree field with more local tree stock.  The first phase was taking cuttings from the willow that seems to be growing more quickly for me.  I’m not sure what variety of willow it is but it has seeded in the tree field in the pond area, presumably from the trees that line the river bank.

set set willow by pond
Willow seeded in by pond

I had already transplanted some of the nicer seedlings that were growing in what should be the track area, but there are a lot of other seedlings coming up beside the pond and in amongst the other trees.  I’m not going to bother to move them.  Willow should take easily from cuttings, so I just selected some longish twigs, removing which should improve the shape of the trees, and cut them out.  I then removed the side branches and cut the main stem (and any thicker suitable side stems) into approx 10 inch lengths.

creating cuttings
Trimming willow cuttings

I didn’t count the number of cuttings I achieved, so I don’t know whether it was 100, 75 or 130 potential trees.  I have pushed them at fairly close spacing (6 ft?) in the damper areas where there seems to have been failure of the previous plantings.  The area by the pond which is very damp, lost a fair few birch and aspen – damaged by voles mainly I think.  That area has been infilled completely.  I have also made a start up by the southern border just under the hump.

area for replanting top
Area above conifers planted with willow cuttings

This area had birch and hazel, but is often quite damp due to springs coming out at the base of the hump.  It is also on the boundary where the prevailing wind comes from.  The hazel struggled to compete with the grass and we lost quite a few.  The ones left are starting to do better as the other trees are coming on.  The birch are some of the ones that have suffered bad die back and I think it’s that they don’t like the damp soil.  The willow however should do better.  I’ve used up all the cuttings I took from down by the pond area.  There’s still more room but some of the saplings transplanted some years there are now pretty big so I should be able to take more cuttings from these to finish off.

hopeful new willow
Newly inserted willow cutting

Harvesting, germination and why we (sometimes) don’t like deer

I’ve not had much time in the garden recently since there are a number of issues that have arisen mostly relating to the shop.  One of my members of staff is poorly, so I had to do extra shifts.  An exciting delivery from a new supplier came during one of my afternoons off so I had to go back down to the shop again to unpack it.  Palmer and Harvey were one of my main suppliers, who have now ceased trading, so I’m having to work out where and if we can get the groceries we normally get from them.  And someone put a planning application for mirror faced cube camping pods in the Glen which I felt obliged to object to.  The weather had been better though – cool and still and a little damp.  S. has bought me for christmas (not really I hope!) two pallet loads of hardwood which arrived on Friday and we spend much of Sunday warming ourselves once by stacking it all away in the woodshed.

Back in the Polytunnel, I have managed to harvest most of the fruit.  I have four more sharks fin melons, ten bunches of ripe grapes, and a very few achocha.  I still have the kiwi to harvest.

polytunnel crops

The grapes were starting to go mouldy, it’s just getting a little cool even in the polytunnel to expect any further ripening.  I think maybe I wasn’t ruthless enough when I thinned out the bunches earlier in the year, although it felt pretty brutal at the time.  I have picked them over and placed them in a glass of water, which hopefully should enable them to keep a little longer.  I also dried some in the bottom oven to make raisins which worked pretty well.  I could do with an easy way of removing the seeds however!  I need to give the vines a good prune now.  I’ve always taken my own approach to pruning; which is to make a cordon stem of the vine from which the fruiting spurs come off.  This seems to work quite well.  I had left a lower branch as well as the high level one, but it still isn’t really growing well.  The branches that come off it are weak and tend to droop down, interfering with the crops at lower level.  This year I’m going to prune the lower branch right out, and remove the wooden framework which also gets in the way of the polytunnel beds.

grapes

I’m not sure I’ll try the achocha again.  I quite like it – it tastes like a cross between a cucumber and a courgette, but it seems not to set very many fruit with me.  Only the fruit later in the season have set.  Mind you, I have noticed a lot of spiders in the polytunnel this year and have suspected that they may be eating a lot of the pollinating insects this year.  Maybe I’ll give it one more go and try and start them off nice and early.

The sharks fin melon I consider to be a big success, despite not getting that many fruit.  They are huge and pretty, and tasty see here.  The noodles do retain their noodly texture when frozen, so I may roast the melons as I need them and freeze the noodles in portions.  I’m going to try and save seed (apparently they carry on ripening in storage) but also see whether I can overwinter the vine, since it is a perennial in warmer climates.  So far I have buried one vine root in kiwi leaves (which have mostly shed now) and covered another with it’s own vine remains.  Although it’s not been very cold for the last couple of weeks.

I seem to have got very good germination from the two lots of Akebia seeds.  Both the ones that I sowed direct and the ones I left on tissue in a polythene bag have almost all got root shoots.  I moved them inside onto a windowsill, rather than leaving them in the polytunnel.  If I can get them through the winter, then I may have rather more plants than I need!  If not then I have dried the rest of the seed and can try growing them  in the spring.

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The last few weeks have seen an intruder in the garden.  For the last few years we have seem thankfully little sign of the deer, and I have been thinking they don’t like the smell of Dyson.  However recently they have been in and caused a little damage to a few of the trees, and munched some of the greenery in the fruit garden.  Luckily I don’t grow much for ourselves outside, but I had been getting a little complacent.  We have planted a hawthorne hedge which I am hoping in the longer term will screen the garden and deter the deer, but that will be a long time before it is big enough to do any good.  I’m pretty sure I heard the stags calling in the rut this year for the first time as well.  I wonder whether one of them was looking for greenery to decorate his antlers?  I gather they do this with bracken at this time to make themselves (presumably) more attractive or impressive.  In the past when we’ve had damage to the trees it’s been in the spring, which is more likely to be them rubbing the velvet off their antlers which they grow new every year.

 

Apricot training

This is not a timely post. I just thought I’d catch up with one of the new exciting plants I’ve got new this year. I’d fancied an Apricot for a long time. Although they probably would grow outside here if you had enough shelter, I’m still a long way away from that. However, I am growing more and more perennial plants in the polytunnel, so I thought I’d like to try it in there.
The plant was a present – a one year grafted whip of Early Moorpark Apricot on Torinel rootstock and was a good height, perhaps 4 feet tall. The first hard thing I had to do on planting it back in February was to cut it right down to about 1 foot tall! This is the exception to the general rule about pruning stone fruit only in summer to avoid silverleaf infection. According to the RHS “Apricots bear fruit on shoots made the previous summer and on short spurs from the older wood” and unless growing as a bush (which I thought would be impractical in the polytunnel) should be grown as fans. I rather fancied an espalier, but again that wouldn’t work for an Apricot. I found the RHS website very helpful in giving directions for training from scratch. So I planted, cut back and watered, and waited, hoping I hadn’t killed my lovely tree!

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Newly planted Apricot
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cut right back!

Sure enough, as promised, several new branches grew strongly from the trunk, which was a bit of a relief – I hadn’t killed it. The next step for me, was to put up some training wires. A little less straightforwards for a free standing fan, since I had no wall to come off. The arch of the polytunnel also meant that I couldn’t put in two vertical posts and string the wire between. I ended up using some random bits of wood we had lying around to create the framework. I had one nice vertical fence post by the centre path in the polytunnel, and one sloping bit as far to the side as I could manage. Since neither was in deep enough to take much strain, I have braced them with horizontal bits of wood before putting across the neccessary horizontal straining wires.
Then came another hard part. Again I had to cut back my lovely tree. This time the object is to select two branches to train in a 90 degree ‘V’ shape. I actually left two on the out board side since I couldn’t decide between them. Since then however, one has lost it’s leading point, so I think the decision has been made for me and I now need to prune that one out.

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Framework and nicely branched Apricot
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Newly trained tree

So far I am very happy with the health of my tree. It has grown well and has had no signs of any problems at all. Since it is undercover I need to keep an eye out for pests. Spidermite may become a problem. I have had this in the past on other plants in the tunnel and it really does stunt the growth. Also the soil I have is not very deep, generally less that two feet and usually less than that. I can’t do much about that. Since the polytunnel is slightly terraced (it slopes from end to end) I have put the Apricot in the downhill bed where the soil is slightly deeper, and I have been careful to water well but seldom, to encourage deep root formation if possible. Next year in the early spring, I will need to bite the bullet again and cut the leaders back again to encourage further branching to create more of the fan structure. I wonder whether I will get any blossom? Very exciting!