A glut of Gooseberries

This year has been really successful for soft fruit.  Despite that frosty spell we had in May all the soft fruit seems to have done really well.  This is partly because the fruit bushes are starting to get more mature.  Larger bushes = more fruit.

The first lot of raspberries in the fruit garden, which I’m starting to call the fruit jungle, were ripening over a week ago.  They took me by surprise when I went to put some weeds on the compost heap in there.  I have picked two batches of raspberries.  On the 14th July, picking all the ripe fruit in the fruit jungle and the front garden, I picked 10oz of good quality raspberries and 2lb 4oz of less cosmetically perfect fruit for jam.  Three days later on the 17th July again I picked all the ripe raspberry fruit, achieving 6oz perfect fruit, and 2lb 3oz jamming fruit.  A small punnet of redcurrants from the tea garden, cooked separately and sieved into the raspberry pulp, gave a soft but satisfactory set to the raspberry jam.  Raspberries are rather low in pectin, so they need more adding to get a good set.  I have used apples in the past, but it is quite satisfying to use my own fruit.  Raspberry jam is one of my favourites, but two batches would see us through the year nicely.  Unfortunately rather a lot of the jar lids have not sealed properly, so the jam will have to be eaten sooner rather than stored.  This means I may have to make another batch of jam so that we have enough to last.

raspberries in fruit jungle
Raspberries in fruit jungle

I have several other raspberries varieties which are still establishing – Glen Prosen in the dog resistant garden, Malling Jewel and Autumn Bliss in the tea garden. and an unknown from AC on the hump overlooking the orchard and leach field.  I am also thinking that the leach field may be a good place to plant another patch of raspberries.  They are shallow rooting, and the spot is very sheltered in between the hump and the orchard.

gooseberries 2019
Bumper Gooseberries

The gooseberries have had the best crop this year that I have ever seen.  From the three bushes in the dog resistant garden I picked 4 1/2 lb, 5lb 4oz, and 2 1/2 lb.  Some of the fruit was a little hard still, but some had already fallen from the bushes as overripe.  This variety is Invicta, which is supposed to be more mildew resistant.  I don’t know about that.  The bush is not too prickly, and the fruit is pale green, large and slightly hairy, going very slightly on the pink side of yellow when super ripe.  It is sweet enough to eat straight from the bush when really ripe.  I picked them all over – topping and tailing them with my fingers, and selecting the larger, nicer looking fruit to sell.  The rest I bagged up and put in the freezer in the short term.  I’m hoping to make chutney  with those.  Locally not everyone has done so well, with problems such as mildew and sawfly really affecting crops, so I feel very lucky this year.

There are two more Invicta gooseberry bushes in the fruit jungle, only one of which is fruiting well.  These still want a bit more ripening, which is odd, since I thought they get more sun there than in the dog resistant garden.  I have a different variety, Pax, in the tea garden.  It is a red variety, but suffered from wind there, is rather lop sided, and does not have enough growth yet to produce a good crop.

redcurrant 2019
Redcurrant Cherry

There are still more redcurrants ripening on the bush that I was picking in the tea garden, as well as on an adjacent bush which has fruit that are just starting to turn colour. I may puree and freeze some to use as pectin additive, and I quite fancy some redcurrant jelly as well.  I think the one I have been picking is Cherry and the one yet to ripen is Rovada.  The varieties were selected to give a spread in the harvest.

blackcurrant and parseley
The main Ben Sarek bushes with accompanying parseley

The blackcurrants I finally got round to picking this week.  I now officially have more blackcurrants than I use myself.  I picked about 9 lb of my Ben Sarek blackcurrants this week when the weather was lovely and warm (we never got the horrid hot weather they had further south – just low 20s with a nice breeze).  There would have been far more to pick, but I left it rather late, so many had fallen off the bushes or gone soft.  The main crop is in the fruit jungle, however I have been planting cuttings in the orchard and further down the tree field, and some of these are now also starting to fruit well.  The other varieties in the tea garden (Ben Gairn and Byelorussian Sweet) are also ripe, so could do with picking now too.

blackcurrant in tree field

Blackcurrant planted in tree field (recently mulched)

 

9 thoughts on “A glut of Gooseberries

  1. Wow – a soft fruit bonanza. At a guess I had about 25 lbs of strawberries but it will be nice in the future to have a bit more of a balance.

    Anyway, the fruit on your redcurrant bushes look amazing. Did you net them?

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    1. 25lb! I am green with envy! My strawberries did alright, in that I had some lovely ripe ones, but only a few made it as far as the kitchen! Maybe next year, if I can keep the weeds away.
      I have to admit turning up the colour slightly on that photo. I was having difficulty highlighting the fruit in the shade. At the moment I seem to get away without netting the fruit. I think it is because I am the only one in this area growing fruit the birds seem to miss us. As the shelter provided by the trees improves that may change. Saying that, I haven’t picked all the fruit yet, so I may have to share a bit!

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      1. I don’t think weeds affect strawberries that much but I suppose it depends how many weeds you have! It’s a shame anyway that you haven’t had a bigger crop. Hopefully next year they will perform better for you.

        Anyway, whatever the reason the birds aren’t eating your other berries, long may it last. I find the birds tend to lose interest in berries by July. And I didn’t see as many blackbirds as in previous years, though this could be due to fewer nesting near us or any number of other factors.

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      2. I think the birds are enjoying eating various insect larvae in the trees, and they have had a few of my wild cherries (first set this year!)

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      3. Ah yes, the birds here have also been enjoying insects or their larvae in the trees. Hurray for trees!

        Good news about your cherries – hopefully you will get a few, too!

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  2. YUMMYLICIOUS! My grandmother always sealed her jelly with paraffin wax. It worked well and lasted for several years. Well, after grandpa passed and I moved here there were many jars that were several years old. I ate and lived. 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

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